Installation

Quick Installation

To install from the Python Package Index simply use either:

$ pip install pyflation

or

$ easy_install pyflation

after installing all the requirements first.

Alternatively if you have downloaded the pyflation-x.x.x.tar.gz file, installing Pyflation is as simple as typing

$ python setup.py install

inside the directory where this file is located.

Requirements

Pyflation has the following requirements:

  • Python 2.6 or higher (tested with 2.6.4)
  • Numpy (tested with 1.3.0)
  • Scipy (tested with 0.7.1)
  • Cython (tested with 0.12.1)
  • PyTables 2.2 or higher (tested with 2.2)

The pyflation.cosmographs module contains helper functions to use with the Matplotlib package but this is not a requirement of the core modules. Useful information on setting up a Python system with Numpy and Scipy is available from the Practical Python for Astronomers course.

In order to compile the documentation you will also need

Basic Installation

First unpack the pyflation-x.x.x.tar.gz file in a suitable location. From the
command line this can be done by using

$ tar xzvf pyflation-x.x.x.tar.gz

Then enter the created directory using

$ cd pyflation-x.x.x

The setup.py script will install pyflation in your local python installation.
If you want to change the location of the installation list the possible options
using

$ python setup.py install --help

The most important option is –prefix which will change the base directory used
in deciding where to store the installation. The default depends on your
installation and local python executable but is often /usr. For example if you
want everything installed under the directory /home/me/localinstall/ then use

$ python setup.py install --prefix=/home/me/localinstall/

If you do not have the appropriate permissions you may not be able to install
to a system directory. In this case using the prefix option with a directory
you can write to is the best option.

Alternatively the virtualenv python module provides a useful way of keeping
python libraries in separate installations. This is useful if you work with
more than one version of a particular library and want to be able to run them
side by side. See http://virtualenv.openplans.org/ for more information.

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